Timelapse: One Storm Dies, Another’s Born

A severe-warned thunderstorm that produced quarter-size hail in Hanahan missed my part of West Ashley to the northeast this afternoon. However, this thunderstorm produced an outflow boundary which intersected with the seabreeze over the Charleston/Dorchester county line to generate new showers and thunderstorms. These thunderstorms pushed east and dropped a brief amount of rain and a little wind before moving on to the southeast.

Summer is the best.

Timelapse: Storm Rolls Onto Hilton Head

I took some opportunities this past weekend to get my feet really wet with the GoPro’s time-lapse shooting capability. Here’s a couple hours of shots watching the skies ahead of a potent evening thunderstorm on Hilton Head Island.

WordCamp Day Is Here

Today is the day we’ve all been waiting for — South Carolina’s first WordCamp, right here in Charleston. Here’s the schedule.

My BoomTown colleague Jason “Frock” Finneyfrock is on at 9am talking about how we use Vagrant and Puppet to maintain development environments; I’m on at 2:30 with an overhauled version of my August 2013 WordCamp Charleston talk, WordPress at Peak Performance.

If you weren’t able to get a ticket (we sold out on Thursday!), never fear — the sessions are being recorded. I’ll update when they are posted to the Web.

If you were able to get a ticket, I sure hope to see you out there! It will be a fun time and I hope you learn a lot.

Dual-polarization radar is worth its weight in gold

Tornado debris signature on April 28, 2014 in SE Tennesee.
Tornado debris signature as seen by the Hytop, AL radar (KHTX) on the night of April 28, 2014. Clockwise from left: Base reflectivity, storm relative velocity, correlation coefficient, differential reflectivity (ZDR). Tornado debris signature is where the “debris ball” of high reflectivity (reds and pinks) colocate with the strong velocity couplet (reds and yellows next to greens in the velocity image), the drop in correlation coefficient (blue circle) and ZDR (gray areas).

Dan Satterfield: NWS Weather Radar Upgrade Proving Wildly Successful

Dual-polarization is a new thing, but I sure don’t know how I or anyone else confidently interpreted radar without it. There is little doubt that the confidence dual-pol products lend to warning forecasters and broadcast meteorologists conveying those critical messages saved a lot of lives on April 28. (Unfortunately, 36 people have died as a result of the outbreak, so there is still plenty of work to be done.)

Updated: IEM Chat Alerts using Adium and Growl

Updated: IEM Chat Alerts using Adium and Growl

The public Iowa Environmental Mesonet chat rooms, which relay real-time NWS products over XMPP, have moved to a new conference server (conference.weather.im), so I updated my reasonably popular (popular has a strange meaning on this blog) post about how to set up popup alerts using Growl to reflect this new info. I also have confirmed that the message phrasing in NWSChat (the National Weather Service’s private chat system for emergency managers and media members) is the same as what is relayed over the public weather.im chat server, so those of you who use Adium with NWSChat will be able to take advantage of Growl’s priority system. I know Growl is less popular now that Notification Center is integrated into OS X, but Growl is still immensely powerful for the right use case (and this is still a great one).