EFF spying case vs. AT&T to move forward

The Electronic Frontier Foundation’s case against AT&T will move forward after a judgement issued today to deny the motions to dismiss on behalf of both AT&T and the federal government. This delivers a tough blow against the government and AT&T, who tried to get the case dismissed for the ever-convenient “national security reasons.”

Here’s EFF’s press release for more information.

6 thoughts on “EFF spying case vs. AT&T to move forward

  1. NotMyBest2Day

    I’m glad somebody’s standing up to “big brother.” Considering AT&T owns basically everything, this is a big deal and a whole bunch of people should be involved, or concerned at the very least.

    I’ve been against the Patriot Act and its “I’m the government, I can do whatever I want without getting permission first” bruhaha. You said it yourself a while back, so much for the Checks & Balances.

  2. NotMyBest2Day

    I’m glad somebody’s standing up to “big brother.” Considering AT&T owns basically everything, this is a big deal and a whole bunch of people should be involved, or concerned at the very least.

    I’ve been against the Patriot Act and its “I’m the government, I can do whatever I want without getting permission first” bruhaha. You said it yourself a while back, so much for the Checks & Balances.

  3. NotMyBest2Day

    I’m surprised the NSA/Administration hasn’t found some reason to relieve him of his duties already. Besides, I don’t see it as being an activist. I see it as the majority of people feel betrayed now, and how are they supposed to trust the gov’t from now on if the gov’t thinks we’re all terrorists?

    It’s just like if someone betrays you, you hate them. You’re not going to run back up to them tomorrow and believe in them again. Trust is hard to build, and when you break it, it either can’t be rebuilt, or it takes a very, very long time to do so.

    In other news, my sister mentioned something at dinner the other night about during the G-8 thing, someone asked Bush what the plan for Iraq/Middle East was, and his response was “That’ll be somebody else’s problem in 2009.” ::shock:: What? You mean you don’t know? You were the advocate of this in the first place, and you don’t know what the game plan is? Something seems wrong with this picture…

  4. NotMyBest2Day

    I’m surprised the NSA/Administration hasn’t found some reason to relieve him of his duties already. Besides, I don’t see it as being an activist. I see it as the majority of people feel betrayed now, and how are they supposed to trust the gov’t from now on if the gov’t thinks we’re all terrorists?

    It’s just like if someone betrays you, you hate them. You’re not going to run back up to them tomorrow and believe in them again. Trust is hard to build, and when you break it, it either can’t be rebuilt, or it takes a very, very long time to do so.

    In other news, my sister mentioned something at dinner the other night about during the G-8 thing, someone asked Bush what the plan for Iraq/Middle East was, and his response was “That’ll be somebody else’s problem in 2009.” ::shock:: What? You mean you don’t know? You were the advocate of this in the first place, and you don’t know what the game plan is? Something seems wrong with this picture…

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