Quashing taboo, or perhaps something more?

I was up at the Stern Center getting a bite to eat today (the only fast food in walking distance, after all) and saw that the VOX “passion party”, a unique and creative way to attract attention to reproductive health and rights issues, was unexpectedly canceled. Further investigation revealed that the College’s administration made the decision to shut down the event in what appears to be the 11th hour. VOX president Kaytlin Bailey is withholding comment at this time but will be making a statement soon. That’s all I know right now — I’m very, very curious to hear more soon, particularly why the administration would decide to shut down an event that, in the past, has been permitted to go on despite its controversial nature. This indicates to me that these prior parties were done in good taste and had educational value, so I am at a loss as to why this year is somehow different. What really blows my mind is that the administration had to be apprised of the party because it was being held in College facilities. It’s very odd. Was the administration spooked by the George Street Observer? Did a parent find out about it and complain? Hopefully some light will be shed on this soon, because this just adds a little more chill to the air, if you know what I mean…

12 thoughts on “Quashing taboo, or perhaps something more?

  1. Agricola

    I saw the GSO issue on Friday and took it home to read in detail. The entire issue, as you know, was dedicated to sexual awareness, issues, activity, and safety. As an adult student, but childless, I could not really comprehend how the CofC could actively participate in an event that was decidedly controversial. If the GSO had stressed sexual health, and had in any way stressed the issue of abstinence, it might not have raised the ire of the administration. But, to my eye, it praised sexual activity, sex toys, and generally seemed to encourage all students to participate. I in no way say that that position is wrong, but I can understand that it might offend the sensibilities of, say, parents, who might not like the notion that their freshmen daughters are being encouraged to explore their sexuality at a college sponsored event. Tough call, and there might not be a right solution.

  2. Agricola

    I saw the GSO issue on Friday and took it home to read in detail. The entire issue, as you know, was dedicated to sexual awareness, issues, activity, and safety. As an adult student, but childless, I could not really comprehend how the CofC could actively participate in an event that was decidedly controversial. If the GSO had stressed sexual health, and had in any way stressed the issue of abstinence, it might not have raised the ire of the administration. But, to my eye, it praised sexual activity, sex toys, and generally seemed to encourage all students to participate. I in no way say that that position is wrong, but I can understand that it might offend the sensibilities of, say, parents, who might not like the notion that their freshmen daughters are being encouraged to explore their sexuality at a college sponsored event. Tough call, and there might not be a right solution.

  3. conseula

    As an adult, with girl children, and as a professor at the College of Charleston, I would be much more concerned if the College went out of its way to avoid all controversy. It’s a college, a place where people should be doing more than acquiring vocational skills. They should be asking questions, engaging ideas, pushing boundaries. Sometimes, but certainly not always, that will lead to controversy. We also need to remember that college campuses are full of adults engaging in adult behavior, including sex. Preaching abstinence and sticking our heads in the sand doesn’t change that.

  4. conseula

    As an adult, with girl children, and as a professor at the College of Charleston, I would be much more concerned if the College went out of its way to avoid all controversy. It’s a college, a place where people should be doing more than acquiring vocational skills. They should be asking questions, engaging ideas, pushing boundaries. Sometimes, but certainly not always, that will lead to controversy. We also need to remember that college campuses are full of adults engaging in adult behavior, including sex. Preaching abstinence and sticking our heads in the sand doesn’t change that.

  5. Agricola

    Teach, expose, explain, yes. Condone, no. I think the powers decided that the CofC should not be in the position of urging behavior, regardless of what any of us think about it.

  6. Agricola

    Teach, expose, explain, yes. Condone, no. I think the powers decided that the CofC should not be in the position of urging behavior, regardless of what any of us think about it.

  7. Earl

    I’m one of those older non-trads at CofC as well, and I’ve followed some of the controversies in recent years. For the most part, they were mountains made out of a mole hills, and the administration response in those cases, was one of reaction, where too much, too late was the chosen approach.

    The Gay/Lesbian studies minor was a good example. From what I understand, it was presented by some outside group (probably hoping to make some money off helping to implement the program) and that the presentation really didn’t set anyone on fire.

    Until the administration overreacted. The 11×17 posters saying the proposal was never considered in any shape, size or form blanketed the campus and give it whole new life.

    I don’t know what they had in mind, but sometimes, students (even some of us older ones) get carried away. But I’d certainly be interested in getting the lowdown on what took place.

  8. Earl

    I’m one of those older non-trads at CofC as well, and I’ve followed some of the controversies in recent years. For the most part, they were mountains made out of a mole hills, and the administration response in those cases, was one of reaction, where too much, too late was the chosen approach.

    The Gay/Lesbian studies minor was a good example. From what I understand, it was presented by some outside group (probably hoping to make some money off helping to implement the program) and that the presentation really didn’t set anyone on fire.

    Until the administration overreacted. The 11×17 posters saying the proposal was never considered in any shape, size or form blanketed the campus and give it whole new life.

    I don’t know what they had in mind, but sometimes, students (even some of us older ones) get carried away. But I’d certainly be interested in getting the lowdown on what took place.

  9. Heather

    I’ve been to a “passion party” and there was no mention of reproductive health. The whole point of the party is to make a buck off adult novelties. Now, it might be different when held at the CofC, but I have my doubts.

    It’s a “naughty” Tupperware party.

  10. Heather

    I’ve been to a “passion party” and there was no mention of reproductive health. The whole point of the party is to make a buck off adult novelties. Now, it might be different when held at the CofC, but I have my doubts.

    It’s a “naughty” Tupperware party.

  11. Jared Smith

    Student Government is meeting tomorrow and, according to a couple sources I have, will be debating the issue. It promises to be a very lively discussion which should shed a lot of light on what went down.

    Keep this up — good discussion here. I’ll add more later when time permits.

  12. Jared Smith

    Student Government is meeting tomorrow and, according to a couple sources I have, will be debating the issue. It promises to be a very lively discussion which should shed a lot of light on what went down.

    Keep this up — good discussion here. I’ll add more later when time permits.

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