Monthly Archives: March 2009

Hunker Down!

Severe weather season roars back to Charleston today. I’m in “hunker down” mode here, monitoring all sorts of varying weather information. Here’s how to keep up:

  • On Twitter, I’ll live-tweet the storm event at @chswx. If you just want warnings and forecasts, I recommend @CharlestonWX. Also see @weatherwatches for advance notice of potential watches. Don’t forget local media, as well, including Rob Fowler, Josh Marthers, Joey Sovine, and the Live 5 Weather Team.
  • I’m uploading radar images periodically to radar.charlestonwx.com. There’s an animation script which gives you 10 frames and many Level III products to play with.
  • If time permits, I’ll do some writing with more detailed analysis at my new weather blog. Given the fast pace of these storms, blogging may be somewhat prohibitive. (It’s much easier to blog a hurricane than it is a springtime weather event.)

Despite all this technology we now have, your best defense is to have a NOAA Weather Radio and make sure to heed all warnings that come down from the National Weather Service or other emergency management officials. Remember, the Internet is a great tool, but is not intended for life-or-death decisions. Stay safe out there!

A meeting about hashtags — no, really

A meeting about hashtags -- no, really

It seems oddly fitting that a few local bloggers, tweeters, and folks from local media outlets got together at Juanita Greenberg’s downtown, sat outside, and talked about — what else? — hashtags. These aren’t your ordinary hashtags, though — these tags are designed to standardize news tweeting in Charleston. This way, we can keep things like breaking news, weather, and other news types separate from each other so that — if the tags are adopted the way we hope — people can find news faster. Dan has a great explanation of our meeting today (the culmination of the #chshash conversation you may have seen over the last couple days). Expect to see more written on these hashtags soon.

Hip to be Square

Hip to be Square

I’m pretty sure this is my first encounter with a square cup. Apparently this year’s rendition of March Madness is so maddening that it’s turned our cups square; at this rate, I fully expect to see pigs in flight within the next 48 hours.

Still waiting for my new Facebook homepage

Guys, I’m starting to feel a little worried about my geek/early adopter cred: My Facebook homepage is still kickin’ it 2008-style, in oldschool static mode. It seems as if this rollout is going REALLY SLOWLY — a comment in this FriendFeed thread seems to suggest that Zuckerberg is going on Oprah to talk about Facebook. If that is indeed the case, and you’ve been eluding the “mom joined Facebook” dilemma, you might be getting an awkward friend request soon. ;) (At least there’s myparentsjoinedfacebook.com to accept your stories.) In any event, when I get the new homepage, I’ll be sure to blather on about it at length as I typically do.

Chess

Chess

I’m part of a group helping to launch Social Media Club in the Charleston area. We meet at aloft North Charleston (aloft’s Brightkite stream). aloft (lack of capitalization is intentional) seems to be a very sweet hotel and is impossible to miss at night. The lobby area, where we conduct our meetings, is definitely progressive, especially for the Charleston area. This chess board is an example of that. Keep an eye on the #smcchs hashtag on Twitter and the Social Media Club Charleston Facebook group for more updates as we get our chapter off the ground.

Case of the Mondays

Don't Drink, Drive, And Park Next To Me

I’d say the positioning of this van next to the Blingmobile was a pretty accurate omen for at least the first half of Monday. Seriously, who does this? And what does it say for my build that I was able to get in the car without the door touching the van? Common sense is extremely uncommon, that’s a fact. Other stuff just was really, really blah all day — not a fun one at all.

However, the weather’s been nice today, if almost hot — 86 at the airport! — so I refused to be defeated. It called for an outdoor lunch of quesadillas and water at Juanita Greenberg’s Nacho Royale on King Street, which was a pretty effective reboot of the day. Here’s the view from the back porch:

Juanita Greenberg's Nacho Royale

The warm weather combined with the Mondayness of it all had me craving a margarita. And while I decided not to make the trek down to Vendue Range for the rooftop experience that I alluded to in my tweet, I know Yo Burrito downtown would set me up right. And they delivered.

Yo Burrito

So Monday, here’s to you — because as crappy and oppressive as you can be, you are not infallible, and I once again claim victory.

Yes, I’m doing it wrong: A blog about blogging

So the conventional wisdom is not to talk about a medium using the medium that is being discussed; i.e. you’re not supposed to tweet about Twitter, you’re not supposed to blog about blogging…whatever. These people who tell you this are the same people who tell you that auto DMs on Twitter are a good thing. Thus, I categorically reject this conventional wisdom, because we don’t break any ground with conventional wisdom ANYWAY.

I don’t know if you’ve noticed, but over the last couple months, I’ve more narrowly focused the blog on social media topics. There’s a lot about Facebook. There’s a cubic crapton about Twitter, all intermingled with some Brightkite, FriendFeed, and identi.ca. Sure, I’ve written about the Super Bowl, but I’ve kept the topics pretty narrowly focused. This is a side effect of my using Twitter; items that I might have posted as “asides” here often end up there because of its sheer convenience. Another thing I’ve discovered: FriendFeed is a stellar way to micro-blog, especially if I need more than 140 characters. It can offer instant feedback and viral promotion via “likes,” and the conversation there is tough to top right now. It’s not just using different services, either. Two of my big topics here of late have been Serious Business show notes and weather, and I’ve shifted both these items off to their own sites in order to let them flourish.

So where does that leave the ol’ homestead? Scrambling to adjust, and reacquire its voice. Continue reading